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    Blog

    The grape behind Italy’s Prosecco wines

    Glera is the principal grape of Prosecco sparkling wine. Originally the grape was known as Prosecco (more precisely Prosecco Tondo). The variety has an unclear origin and an even more complicated ampelographic history due to the fact that several distinct varieties have been called “Prosecco-something” in northeast Italy since the 18th century. The grape is late-ripening and prone to both fungal diseases and water stress. It is widely planted in the province of Treviso.

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    The grape varieties of Italy’s Veneto region

    The grape varieties of Veneto 

    Veneto’s grape varieties are almost equally divided between white and red. More than 60% of the cultivated varieties are native or Italian grapes. Among them, the indigenous Glera, Garganega and Corvina Veronese account for almost half of Veneto’s total plantings.

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    Native Italian grape varieties saved from near-extinction!

    A number of Friuli’s native varieties were rescued from the brink of disappearance. Let us introduce you to Vitovska and Pignolo.

    Vitovska: The name of this white grape variety is of clear Slavic origin, but it is generally considered to be a native variety of both eastern Friuli and Slovenia, as it was historically only cultivated in Carso (in the province of Trieste) and in Slovenia.

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    Think you know Lambrusco? Think again!

    Lambrusco Family: Lambrusco represents one of the most ancient families of native grapes in Italy. In fact, it is so ancient, that a specific area of origin has not been determined. Historically, they were believed to descend from domesticated wild vines. All the Lambrusco grapes are related to each other but are considered distinct varieties. In general, the wines produced from these grapes share common features, such as high acidity, moderate alcohol and red fruit-floral aromas, however, each variety does express a distinct character, despite such similarities.

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