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Displaying items by tag: viticulture

In this webinar, Nova Cadamatre, MW and winemaker, will deliver a grapevine anatomy lesson and discuss how growing conditions impact the vine. If you ever wished you knew a little more about how heat, wind, drought, rain, and cloud cover impact photosynthesis, why hot vintages produce “green” wines, and what it takes to make a good vintage…this “bud” is for you.

WSG launches “Vine to Wine,” an exciting, new blog series that will chronicle what is happening in the vineyard and in the winery each and every month of the calendar year. Nova Cadamatre, MW and winemaker, will author these authoritative and detailed posts drawing upon her studies (Cornell Viticulture and Enology graduate) as well as her winemaking experience in California, China and the Finger Lakes.

The series will kick off with a webinar on January 6th at 12 noon ET.  Nova will give a grapevine anatomy lesson and discuss how growing conditions impact the vine. The series will wrap up with another webinar in December of 2021 comparing the different viti/vini practices involved in crafting a $15 bottle of wine as opposed to a $75 bottle of wine. 

Each “Vine to Wine” installment will detail that month’s vineyard and winery tasks with deep dives into a particular grape growing or wine making topic such as pruning methods and training systems or barrel aging and fermentation vessels.

The series is designed to give wine students and educators an opportunity to develop or hone their technical savvy. 

PRESENTER: Nova Cadamatre MW 

Nova Cadamatre is a winemaker, writer, and blogger. As one of the first graduates of Cornell’s Viticulture and Enology program in 2006, Nova relocated to California to assume a number of winemaking roles. She has worked for numerous iconic wineries in CA including Robert Mondavi Winery, Souverain, Beringer, and Chateau St. Jean. She was also involved as a contestant in the Ningxia Winemaker Challenge making wine in Ningxia, China with Lansai Chateau from 2015-2017.

In 2017, she became the first female winemaker to become an MW in the US and in 2014, Cadamatre was named to Wine Enthusiast’s Top 40 under 40 list. She has numerous 90+ scoring wines to her credit and writes her blog at www.novacadamatre.com 

 

Published in Viticulture

In this live one hour webinar we will explore the great wines of Europe crafted in some of the most intense situations. Appellations such as: Valtellina, the Mosel, the Cinque Terre, Lanzarote, and more!

Join me to explore the magical house of cards which allows these wines to exist under such extreme circumstances: terroir conditions, human ingenuity and passion. Discover the serendipity of the elements aligning to craft some of the most beautiful wines in the world, from the most extreme places.

Presenter: Tanya Morning Star

Tanya Morning Star is the owner of Cellar Muse Wine School in Seattle Washington where she teaches the French, Italian, and Spanish Wine Scholar certification courses, she is proud to have been named French Wine Scholar Instructor of the Year in 2018. Tanya is an approved WSET instructor for L1-L4 curriculums, and is faculty at South Seattle College where she is a professor of Wine History, and has developed many wines of the world curriculums. She is an Official Ambassador of Bourgogne Wines, the Official Ambassador of Orvieto Wines, and works frequently in both France and Italy.

Tanya holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts from New York Universitys Tisch School of the Arts, is a Certified Wine Educator, has completed the WSET curriculums through Diploma Level, and has passed the Bourgogne Master, Provence Master, and Champagne Master Levels, all in the top scorer category.
Tanya brings joy into studying to help students find their path to success.

Published in Viticulture
Wednesday, 08 January 2020 19:48

Vine School: Part 1 – Common Vine-Training Systems

While it may not be the most glamorous subject matter, vine-training is an essential topic to understand for students of wine. The method in which a vigneron replants and manages the growth of vines has big implications on matters concerning yields, protection against weather, and the overall quality of the final wine. Furthermore, because of its effect on labor and resource deployment, vine-training can determine whether a winemaker’s operation is financially viable in the first place.

Published in Blog
  • Do you prefer Rieslings that are floral or fruity?
  • Or do you appreciate an Old World style of Riesling with a petrol character?

Regardless of your preference, the characteristics of the wines you enjoy come from the vineyard. Climate, site, and vineyard management practices directly impact the production of specific flavors and aromas in wine grapes.

In this webinar you will learn how the unique Riesling qualities you value are produced in the vineyard and how climatic variation impacts those traits.

Presenter: Justine Vanden Heuvel

Justine Vanden Heuvel is an Associate Professor in Cornell University’s School of Integrative Plant Science. She is actively involved in both research and teaching. She co-teaches the popular “Wines & Vines” class at Cornell, as well as more advanced courses including “Principles and Practices of Growing Grapes and Making Wines”.

Dr. Vanden Heuvel’s research focuses on optimizing flavors and aromas in wine grapes, and improving both the environmental and economic sustainability of wine grape production systems in cool climates. In response to the broad needs of the grape and wine industry, her program has established a strong focus on multi-disciplinary and collaborative approaches.

Dr. Vanden Heuvel is widely published in the field, with some of her most recent work appearing in the American Journal of Enology and Viticulture, Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, HortTechnology and the Australian Journal of Grape and Wine Research. She is currently writing a textbook intended for college-level introductory courses in Viticulture and Enology.

Bibliography

  • Reynolds, A.G., I.V. Senchuk, C. van der Reest, C. de Savigny. 2007. Use of GPS and GIS for elucidation of terroir: Spatial variation in an Ontario Riesling vineyard. American Journal of Enology and Viticulture 58: 145-162.
  • Fischer, U., D. Roth, and M. Christmann. 1999. The impact of geographic origin, vintage, and wine estate on sensory properties of Vitis vinifera cv. Riesling wines. Food Quality and Preference 10: 281-288.
  • Meyers, J.M., G.L. Sacks, and J.E. Vanden Heuvel. 2013. Glycosylated aroma compound responses in ‘Riesling’ grapes to cluster exposure and vine yield. HortTechnology 23: 581-588.
  • Vanden Heuvel, J.E. and T.L. Preszler, 2014. Cluster thinning in Late Harvest Riesling: Does it pay? Wines and Vines Magazine, May issue: 90-97.
  • Kwasniewski, M.T., J.E. Vanden Heuvel, B. Pan, and G.L. Sacks. 2010. Timing of cluster light environment manipulation during grape development affects C13 norisoprenoid and carotenoid concentration of Riesling. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 58: 6841-6849.
  • Reynolds, A.G., D.A. Wardle, M.A. Cliff, and M. King. 2004. Impact of training system and vine spacing on vine performance, berry composition, and wine sensory attributes in Riesling. American Journal of Enology and Viticulture 55: 96-103.
  • Preszler, T.L., T.M. Schmit, and J.E. Vanden Heuvel. 2010. A model to establish economically sustainable cluster thinning practices. American Journal of Enology and Viticulture 61: 140-146.
  • Preszler, T.L., T.M.Schmit, and J.E. Vanden Heuvel. 2013. Cluster thinning reduces the economic sustainability of Riesling production. American Journal of Enology and Viticulture 64: 333-341.
  • Reynolds, A.G. and J.E. Vanden Heuvel. 2009. Influence of grapevine training systems on vine growth and fruit composition: A review. American Journal of Enology and Viticulture 60: 251-268.

Study Alsace wines in-depth with our Alsace Master-Level Program and Alsace Study Trips. Learn more about French wines with the French Wine Scholar study & certification program.

Published in Viticulture

Wine is a product of grapes, but it is just as much a product of the environment in which those grapes are grown. In this webinar, we will explore the important factors that ultimately influence what ends up in your glass, inclusive of climate, soil, vine propagation, planting decisions, farming practices and harvest considerations.

Presenter: Tracy Ellen Kamens, Ed.D., DWS, CWE

Tracy Ellen Kamens is a wine educator, writer and consultant who currently serves at Membership Director for the Wine Scholar Guild. In addition to her role as an ambassador for the Napa Valley Vintners and the Alliance des Crus Bourgeois, she is on the Curation Team for Wine Ring.

Tracy has taught at the International Wine Center, New York University, Cornell University and Baruch College and has also worked with the Wine & Spirit Education Trust, Consorzio Chianti Classico, Balzac Communications, Consorzio Prosecco Superiore and Sopexa. Dr. Kamens previously spent time at Deutsch Family Wine & Spirits in their public relations department.

Tracy earned her doctorate in higher education and also holds the WSET Diploma of Wine & Spirits and the Society of Wine Educators’ Certified Wine Educator certification.

 

Published in Viticulture

There is growing worldwide awareness of the need for sustainable viticultural practices. In France, the most widely accepted strategy is termed la lutte raisonnée, a flexible approach implying reduced use of chemicals, yet without specific criteria. Vineyards employing organic cultivation or la culture biologique are increasing yet remain limited as a share of the total. Growers who claim “bio” status on their labels are subject to official standards and certification. Biodynamic winegrowing, or la biodynamie, combines organic methods with faith-based beliefs. This seminar examines each of these approaches, outlining their features and assessing their costs and benefits.

Learn more about wines with the Wine Scholar Guild's study & certification program and sign up for our Wine Study Trips.

Published in Viticulture

What is the relationship between soil properties and wine characteristics – cause and effect or cause of confusion? There is a broad divide separating scientists from traditional winegrowers. The vital facts concerning soil structure and chemistry are identified and compared to intuitive claims by vignerons. The seminar explores issues such as permeability and aeration and the critical question of water availability to the vine. Key elements including potassium, nitrogen and calcium are discussed. Last, the seminar outlines the widely differing soil types in global wine regions. In sum, this session has universal relevance to the study of wine and should not be missed by any serious student or educator.

Presenter: Roger Bohmrich MW

In 1993, Roger became one of the first Americans to pass the Master of Wine (“MW”) examination administered by the Institute of Masters of Wine in London. For ten years he dedicated himself to the MW cause, first as Education Coordinator of the North American educational program, then as Chairman of the No. American Advisory Board, leading the formation of the non-profit Institute of Masters of Wine (No. America), where he served three terms as its first President.

Roger has worked for two national importers, last as Senior Vice President-Marketing for Frederick Wildman & Sons, New York, where he directed a team in brand management, advertising, and public relations. He acted as buyer and liaison with wineries in a dozen countries, and also developed training and education for the firm’s staff and wholesale clients.

More recently, he set up the U.S. affiliate of Millesima, S.A., Europe’s leader in direct sales of fine wines to consumers via mail order and the internet. At present, he is an independent educator, speaker and consultant. Visit Roger's website: http://www.vintrinsic.com/

His articles and writing have appeared in Wine Business Monthly, Santé Magazine for restaurant professionals, and The Business of Wine – An Encyclopedia. Roger also provides the “Wine Q&A” replies to questions posted on LocalWineEvents.com.

Roger has an intimate association with Rhône Valley wines, travelling regularly to the region to taste the new vintage and visit vineyards and cellars. He brings this expertise and his MW background to the Rhône Master-Level program.

Learn more about wines with the Wine Scholar Guild's study & certification program and sign up for our Wine Study Trips.

Published in Viticulture
Tuesday, 13 March 2012 04:00

Vine Stress with Christy Canterbury MW

We've all heard that a vine needs to be stressed to produce high quality fruit.

Well, what exactly is vine stress and what are the major factors which lead to this condition? More importantly, how do these different types of vine stress affect fruit quality?

Presenter: Christy Canterburry MW

Christy Canterbury is a Master of Wine, wine buyer, writer and educator who lives in Manhattan. Christy has bought wine as the National Wine Director for Smith & Wollensky Restaurant Group and as the Corporate Beverage Director for Culinary Concepts by Jean-Georges, where she opened and managed restaurants from Istanbul and Doha to Vancouver and Bora Bora. She was also the Wine Acquisitions Director for Italian Wine Merchants, a high-end retail concept catering to wine collectors.

Christy currently divides her time between many activities. She is a judge for the Ultimate Wine Challenge and the Dallas Morning News/TEXSOM Wine Competition; a contributing taster at vitis.com; an educator at Astor Center and San Francisco Wine Center; a panelist for Wine Enthusiast, TASTED and Wine & Spirits magazines; the Wine Editor for the Garrubbo Guide and the Italy Wine Editor for the Professional Wine Reference.

Learn more about wines with the Wine Scholar Guild's study & certification program and sign up for our Wine Study Trips.

Published in Viticulture
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