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Displaying items by tag: wine trends

Every drop of wine we ever drink is the product of observation, intervention and craftsmanship.  Without intervention, every wine would be oxidising and turning to vinegar; without craftsmanship, every wine would be rough and unpalatable.  Advances in craftsmanship have brought us the extraordinary beauty and diversity we are all familiar with and that we celebrate in today’s wine world.

What have been the key winemaking advances of the last two decades, and what changes and challenges await in a world of rapid and unprecedented climate change? 

 Among the many topics our expert panel hopes to touch on are

  • Dramatic advances in the sorting and handling of harvested fruit
  • The deepening understanding of balance in wine (acidity, alcohol, other elements)
  • Changing attitudes to the role of oak in élevage, and the increasing use of large wooden vessels, of well-seasoned oak, of concrete and of earthenware vessels
  • The role of oxygen in fermentation and ageing processes (micro-oxygenation through to controlled oxidation)
  • Skin-contact white wines (orange or amber wines, or qvevri-made white wines)
  • The deepening understanding of tannins, especially in red wines, and the extraordinary advances in textural sophistication of red wines in certain regions
  • The meaning and application of “non-interventionism” as a means to achieving vineyard or terroir expression
  • ‘Precision’ and ‘purity’ as the new aesthetic desiderata for wine, replacing those such as ‘power’, ‘opulence’ and ‘generosity’
  • The role of (primary) fruit flavours in wine
  • Warm and hot vintages: responses in vineyard and winery
  • Redefining varietal styles and regional styles for a changing world

The panel will discuss these and other questions in an accessible, non-technical style, with the emphasis on those changes most clearly evident to wine students and keen wine drinkers.

Wine Scholar Guild Academic Advisor Andrew Jefford, speaking from France, will be bringing together a panel of key thinkers, writers and winemakers in four countries to talk through these and other issues. 

Fiona Morrison MW is a writer, winemaker and wine merchant based in both Bordeaux (where with her husband Jacques Thienpont she manages Ch Le Pin, L’If and Le Hêtre) and in Belgium, where she manages the family Thienpont négociant business; she obtained her MW in 1994. 

St Helena-based Rosemary Cakebread owns and makes the wines for the much-admired Gallica; she is a former winemaker and consulting winemaker for Spottswoode. 

Consultant and writer Pedro Ballesteros MW is a qualified agronomical engineer and holds a Masters degree in viticulture and oenology, as well as having obtained his MW in 2010.  A polymath and polyglot (working in four languages: English, French, Spanish and Italian), Pedro is based in Brussels where he formerly worked for the European Union. 

Tuscany-based Alberto Antonini was cited by Decanter magazine in 2015 as one of the five most influential winemaking consultants in the world.  After training in Tuscany, Bordeaux and in Napa and working for Frescobaldi and Col D’Orcia, Alberto now consults in Italy, Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, California, Canada, Spain, Portugal, Armenia, Russia, Israel and Australia. 

Published in Vinification

The Covid-19 pandemic has changed the texture of life for us all, and left no field of economic activity unruffled.  More than 2.5 million people have lost their lives and 115 million have been infected, with up to one in 10 of those infected suffering long-term consequences.  

Anosmia (the loss of taste and smell) is a symptom of Covid.  International travel has slowed to a trickle; restaurants and bars have closed; festivities and celebrations of all sorts have become muted.  

Wine, as a widely traded commodity and one synonymous with conviviality, has been profoundly though irregularly affected.  Who are the winners and losers?  Has the crisis changed the way we think about wine?  What new ways have we found to talk about and to share our wine experiences?  In a world whose biggest challenge remains the climate crisis, might ‘travel shame’ affect the wine world?  Is luxury still alluring?  Have the different rates of success in fighting the virus in different parts of the world changed the balance of power in the wine world?  

These are some of the questions we aim to discuss in this upcoming Meeting of the Minds.

Wine Scholar Guild Academic Advisor Andrew Jefford, speaking from France, will be bringing together a panel of key thinkers, educators, writers and experts in four countries to talk through these and other issues.  

PRESENTER: ANDREW JEFFORD 

Academic Advisor to the Wine Scholar Guild, Andrew has been writing about wine since 1988, notably for The Evening Standard and The Financial Times among other UK newspapers.  He has columns in every edition of Decanter magazine and World of Fine Wine magazine, and is co-chair of Decanter World Wine Awards and vice-chair of Decanter Asia Wine Awards.  His books include The New France, Whisky Island and Andrew Jefford’s Wine Course.

MEET THE PANEL:

New York-based Eric Asimov is the Chief Wine Critic of the The New York Times; his books include How to Love Wine: A Memoir and Manifesto and Wine With Food: Pairing Notes and Recipes from the New York Times.  

Speaking from Ampuis in the Northern Rhône, comes Philippe Guigal, the third generation of one of France’s most significant and dynamic wine families, exporting its wines to 137 different countries around the world

Master of Wine Fongyee Walker read Classical Chinese at Cambridge University and captained the University Blind Tasting team before moving to Beijing to found Dragon Phoenix Wine Consulting with her husband, fellow MW Edward Ragg.  

Former lawyer Professor Steve Charters MW teaches Wine Marketing at the Burgundy School of Business in Dijon, having formerly taught at the Reims Management School and at the Edith Cowan University in Perth; he obtained his MW in 1997.  He also blogs at https://wineandculture.net/

Wednesday, 30 September 2020 15:45

Meeting of the Minds - Trends in Bordeaux

Our next Meeting of the Minds will cover the issues and challenges facing Bordeaux, France's largest AOC wine region and an area that drives the global fine wine market. Jane Anson, Bordeaux expert and author of the encyclopedic Inside Bordeaux (described as a 'category buster' by Jamie Goode and 'the most complete, up to date and scientifically accurate book on Bordeaux' by Imbibe magazine) will host the discussion. She will bring together one of the region's leading négociants (and organic winemaker at his home estate) Mathieu Chardonnier of CVBG-Dourthe-Kressmann (Compagnie des vins de Bordeaux et de Gironde), Smith Haut Lafitte's technical director Fabien Teitgen and wine educator Tanisha Townsend to debate new developments in viticulture and winemaking in the face of a changing climate, as well as looking out how the commerce and marketing of the region should take on the challenges of the next decade in the face of Covid, changing consumer behaviour and the challenges of selling En Primeur.

PRESENTER: JANE ANSON

Jane Anson is Bordeaux correspondent for Decanter, and has lived in the region since 2003. She is author of Inside Bordeaux (BB&R Publishing 2020), Wine Revolution (Quarto Publishing 2017), The Club of Nine with Andy Katz (2016), Angélus (Editions de la Martinière 2015), Bordeaux Legends, a history of the First Growth wines (November 2012 Editions de la Martiniere as Elixirs (French title) / April 2013 Stewart, Tabori & Chang, English version), the Bordeaux and Southwest France author of The Wine Opus and 1000 Great Wines That Won’t Cost A Fortune (both Dorling Kindersley, 2010 and 2011). Anson is contributing writer of the Michelin Guide to the Wine Regions of France (March 2010, Michelin Publications), and writes a monthly wine column for the South China Morning Post in Hong Kong, where she lived from 1994 to 1997, and a weekly column for DecanterChina.com. Accredited wine teacher at the Bordeaux Ecole du Vin, with a Masters in publishing from University College London, WSET qualified, Diplôme Universitaire d'Aptitude à la Dégustation des vins (DUAD) from Bordeaux Faculty of Oenology (2013).

  

MEET THE PANEL:

Mathieu Chardonnier, CEO of CVBG (Compagnie des vins de Bordeaux et de Gironde)

Mathieu Chadronnier, CEO of CVBG, is one of Bordeaux's most influential wine negociants and one of its youngest top players. A modernist in this traditionalist world, he has pioneered new IT solutions to fine wine distribution, and is at the forefront of the recent introduction of great “Beyond Bordeaux” wines on the place de Bordeaux.
In a sometimes commoditized market, he has always placed trust in relationships, candid passion and extensive knowledge of fine wines among his core values.
Beyond his busy career as a grand cru negociant, Mathieu runs Château Marsau with his wife Anne-Laurence, a professional winemaker, with whom he shares his passion for great wines.

Fabien Teitgen, General Manager of Château Smith Haut Lafitte

Fabien Teitgen is a child of Nature. From a very early age he would accompany his grandfather through his vineyard and as he grew up, developed a very deep respect for Nature around him. It was thus, that a true passion was born...

After graduating from viticulture and winemaking in Rennes and in Montpellier, Fabien Teitgen was then initiated into “listening to the earth” by Paul Pétrou, (Château Canon la Gaffelière). Over the years he learned to “read the signs of the vines, to respect and to love them.

Drawing upon this extensive experience, Fabien joined Château Smith Haut Lafitte at the beginning of the 90’s and quickly rose to became Technical Director of the estate.

With his agricultural and winemaking qualification he brought extensive knowledge of viticulture and wine, whilst on the other hand his experience of the soil brought a practical wisdom and a strong ability to listen and understand the behaviour of the vines.

It is in this vein, that Fabien along with Florence and Daniel Cathiard ; owners of Château Smith Haut Lafitte, have developed a unique working method called : «Organic Precision ».

After more than 25 years of commitment, this approach ; from ploughing with horses in the vineyard, to the establishment of an on-site cooperage and an island-based rootstock nursery in the Garonne river. As well as the building of a positive energy Stealth Cellar, have all been hailed as a great success by wine professionals, global press and wine lovers from all around the world.

Fabien Teitgen strives to make wines in perfect harmony with Chateau Smith Haut Lafitte’s magnificent terroir. Wines that are full-bodied and powerful but also smooth, harmonious, and elegant.

These rather opposing characteristics stand testament, as one of the greatest wines from a great terroir which captures the pleasure and emotions of wine lovers.

Since 2014, Fabien Teitgen has been responsible for the wine making at Château Beauregard in Pomerol.

In 2016, Fabien Teitgen was promoted to General Manager of Château Smith Haut Lafitte.

Tanisha Townsend, Chief Wine Officer of lifestyle agency Girl Meets Glass

Tanisha Townsend has cultivated a community of wine enthusiasts through an unyielding passion for oenology. As Chief Wine Officer of lifestyle agency Girl Meets Glass, Tanisha leads wine classes and tours in Paris (and virtually). She also hosts the podcast, Wine School Dropout. Her goal is to empower individuals with an advanced knowledge of wine & spirits in order to build confidence in their tastes and make choices as a better informed consumer.

LEARN MORE ABOUT BORDEAUX:

Published in Bordeaux wines

11:00am France, 10:00am UK, 05:00am NYC, 02:00am LA, 5:00pm HK 
Check the event time in your time zone.
This interview will be recorded for later viewing

On July 29th, WSG begins a new “WSG Live” series in which our presenters talk at length with some of the extraordinary individuals working in today’s wine world, both those involved in creating wines as well as those involved in communication and education. WSG Members will be able to join the conversation live.

There is, arguably, no wine mind more extraordinary, more capacious or better informed than that of Jancis Robinson MW.

After university studies in mathematics and philosophy at Oxford, Jancis worked for a short while in the travel business before becoming a wine trade journalist in 1976. Within three years she was the wine correspondent of the Sunday Times, and over the following four decades her staggering output of journalism, books and media interventions has almost single-handedly transformed the wine world.

Every WSG student will be familiar with the reference books she has either created herself or collaborated on with others: they are the foundation of every wine library, and the starting point for every journey into wine education: Vines, Grapes & Wines (first published 1986), The Oxford Companion to Wine (first published 1994, now in its fourth edition), The World Atlas of Wine (written by Hugh Johnson, but revised and co-written by Jancis from the fifth edition in 2001, and now in its eighth edition) and Wine Grapes (with Julia Harding and José Vouillamoz, 2012). Leavening these reference monuments has come a feast of other books on wine subjects, including wine and health, wine and gastronomy, a wine course, wine’s ageing trajectories and specialist books on North American wines and Portuguese wines.

She became a Master of Wine (and the first journalist to pass the exam) in 1984. Jancis is also an accomplished television and radio performer, has consulted on wine for British Airways, has designed her own wine glasses and helps choose the wines served at Buckingham Palace. The copious awards she has won include six James Beard awards, the Grand Award of the OIV, an Honorary Doctorate from the Open University, the Chevalier de l’Ordre du Mérite Agricole in France and the Officer of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (OBE) in the UK. She is also the creator and chief contributor to the much-admired jancisrobinson.com, notable as a dual subscription/free access wine resource; she is also known to the Davos circuit as the wine correspondent of The Financial Times since 1990 (and has indeed lectured at Davos).

On July 29th, Wine Scholar Guild Academic Advisor Andrew Jefford will be talking at length to Jancis about some of the highlights of her long career and just how she managed to achieve so much; about her wine preferences (and dislikes); about wine education and its challenges; about the cultural significance of wine; about changes in the wine world over the past four decades – and about what the next decade might bring.

Published in WSG Live
Thursday, 07 May 2020 10:07

Meeting of the Minds - Trends in Champagne

Champagne specialist Essi Avellan MW hosts a live discussion on the latest trends in Champagne and outlook for the region's future. Her prestigious panel will be covering a broad range of trends from vineyards to winery as well as business. She will be joined by cellar master Cyril Brun of the prestigious house Charles Heidsieck, Vallée de la Marne Meunier specialist Cédric Moussé of Moussé Fils, renowned Côte des Bar proprietor and innovator Michel Drappier and professor of wine marketing and Master of Wine Steve Charters.

PRESENTER: ESSI AVELLAN MW

 

 

 

 

Champagne and sparkling wine specialist Essi Avellan was Finland’s first Master of Wine. Together with Tom Stevenson she is the author of the Christie’s World Encyclopedia of Champagne and Sparkling Wine. Essi is the organiser of the annual Grand Champagne Helsinki event and a jury member at the Champagne and Sparkling Wine World Championships. She has has been knighted as Chevalier l’Ordre du Mérite Agricole by the Minister of Agriculture of France. 

MEET THE PANEL:

Cyril Brun  

Cellar Master of Maison Charles Heidsieck

Cédric Moussé


of Moussé Fils

Michel Drappier


of Champagne Drappier

Steve Charters MW  


Professor of wine marketing

LEARN MORE ABOUT CHAMPAGNE:

MEMBER SPECIAL: We remind WSG members that they are enjoying a 20% discount on the 4th edition of “Christie's Encyclopedia of Champagne and Sparkling Wine", written by Tom Stevenson and Essi Avellan MW. Details and coupon code HERE.

Published in Champagne wines

Jerez is among the older wine regions in the World, with nearly 3,000 years of continued wine activity. Over the centuries, wine production has evolved into very unique methods of production and a whole series of different wines of very strong identity, which were finally regulated under the first DO appellation in Spain, 85 years ago. But wine production continues to evolve in the Sherry region and local winemakers are now experimenting beyond the DO rules to find new ways of expressing the true identity of the Jerez soil, climate, and cultural roots. Join us as we explore the key moments in the history of Sherry wines, understand how the DO was established, and investigate some of the new oenological developments in the region.

Presenter: César Saldaña 

César was born in Jerez, Spain, and, although closely related to the world of the Sherry bodegas since his very early days, César started working as a firm consultant in Madrid. He returned to Jerez in 1985 to join the Sherry trade, first as an Export Manager at González Byass´ International Division and then at The House of Sandeman as Commercial Director, with marketing and sales responsibilities over both the Sherry and the Port side of the company.
In 2000 he joined the Consejo Regulador de las Denominación de Origen de los Vinos de Jerez as General Manager where he interacts with the more than 2,000 growers and approximately 90 bodegas (wine shippers). In his position, César spends a significant part of his time lecturing on Sherry wines and Brandy de Jerez, both in Jerez and internationally.
Apart from his position at the Consejo, César Saldaña is a member of some of the Spanish official bodies involved in the promotion, regulation, and protection of Spanish quality wines and spirits. He is also General Manager of the Regulating Body for Brandy de Jerez and President of the Ruta del Vino del Marco de Jerez, the leading wine route in Spain, with over 100 members and more than 580,000 visitors in 2018!

Learn more about Spanish Wines:

Published in Andalucía

Chablis is very much its own place, part of Burgundy but in some ways quite different. Once frost protection methods were developed, previously precarious viticulture finally became viable. Chablis is now in the capable hands of a bright younger generation, inspiring a gentle evolution in their vineyard and cellars. Let us hope that climate change will not affect the unique style of the world’s most famous Chardonnay.

Presenter: Rosemary George MW

Rosemary George was one of the first women to become a Master of Wine just over 40 years ago, and she has been writing about wine for nearly as long. Her first book, Chablis and the wines of the Yonne was published in 1984; a second book on Chablis appeared 25 years later, with her third book on the subject, Chablis and the Grand Auxerrois, being published in 2019. This latest work includes many of the grandchildren of the wine growers in her very first book.

She also writes extensively about the Languedoc, including her blog www.tastelanguedocblogspot.com and a recent book, Wines of the Languedoc, published in 2018. She is currently researching her 14th book, The Wines of Roussillon, and has also covered New Zealand and Tuscany.

About Rosemary's Latest Book

Chablis has a distinct identity amongst the wines of Burgundy. The gently sloping vineyards of this small, scenic region produce a remarkably diverse range of wines, even though all are made from just one variety – Chardonnay.

As in other parts of France, it was the Romans who introduced vines and the medieval Church which expanded the vineyard. By the twelfth century the wines of Chablis were already being celebrated in poetry. However, over the centuries a considerable amount of everyday wine also found its way via the river Yonne to the cafés of Paris. In its heyday of production towards the end of the nineteenth century the region encompassed 40,000 hectares of vines. But that was before phylloxera and oidium ravaged the vineyards and the railways brought competition from further south to the capital’s wine drinkers.

From a low point of 500 hectares just after the Second World War, the vineyard has now expanded more than tenfold, and quality has increased too. Wines in the appellation’s four categories – grand cru, premier cru, Chablis and Petit Chablis – are created by vignerons keen to work with the terroir to produce the elegant, mineral, long-lived wines for which the region earned its reputation. To this end, ever greater care is being taken in the vineyards and the routine use of chemicals is becoming increasingly uncommon.

The region’s history, unique soil, geography and climate are all covered in detail, but it is Rosemary George’s lively and insightful profiles of those who make the region’s wines that form the body of The wines of Chablis and the Grand Auxerrois. Through the lives of these vignerons – from the lows of disastrous weather to their love of the land – she paints a unique picture of a much-admired region.

WSG members enjoy a 40% discount off the price of book! Get your coupon code HERE

Learn more about Burgundy:

Published in Bourgogne wines
Wednesday, 25 September 2019 16:28

Finding Value in Burgundy with Tim Magnus

Over the years I’ve had many discussions with people who insist that there’s little good value to be found in Burgundy. While I’d be the first to admit that the big names like Roumier & Rousseau are wildly overpriced, largely due to the speculation on the secondary market, I’ll never admit there’s not great value to be found if time and energy are invested searching for it.

Join me for an exploration of great terroirs and producers who offer truly meaningful wines at incredibly fair prices.

Presenter: Timothy Magnus Dip WSET - Weinakademiker

After growing up in Australia and falling in love with wine from an early age, Timothy Magnus spent several years working in the New South Wales wine region Hunter Valley. In 2007 Tim met a Swiss wine lover and it was truly love at first sight. They married in 2008 and now live near Zürich Switzerland with their 2 young children.

In 2012 Tim completed the WSET Level 4 Diploma through the Wine Academy Austria, becoming an Associate of the Institute of Wines & Spirits. In 2015 upon completion of his research thesis Tim received the title 'Weinakademiker' as well as winning the inaugural 'Swiss Wine Award' for his research thesis. He is also an Accredited International Bordeaux Wine Educator. Since 2011 Tim has taught wine courses for different companies and schools including Switzerland's largest and most famous.

Sharing his passion for wine is what Tim lives for, which is the reason for establishing Magnus Vinum.

Learn more about Burgundy:

Published in Bourgogne wines
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