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Displaying items by tag: winemaking

Wednesday, 05 October 2022 13:10

Sulphites in Wine with Simon J. Woolf

Join us on October 5 for this WSG Live which is FREE and OPEN TO ALL! If you're not a WSG Member, please follow this link to register. You will receive the Zoom link via email before the event. Can't join live? Follow the link to register and we will send you a link to watch after. We look forward to seeing you there! 

The use of Sulphur Dioxide (SO2), often just referred to as “sulphites”, in winemaking has become a much-debated and even sometimes emotive topic in the 21st century.

Since the advent of readily available SO2 in tablet or powder form, dating back roughly to the 1950s, winemakers have relied on this all-purpose elemental substance for everything from cleaning  barrels to protection against oxidation and its abilities to kill stray yeasts and bacterias. It can seem almost alchemical in its ability to transform a cloudy, off-smelling funk into a estar-bright, fragrant smelling wine.

But in the last few decades with the growth of the natural wine movement, excess use – or sometimes any use – of SO2 has become increasingly frowned on. Some wine drinkers even claim they are intolerant to SO2, and that they can no longer drink conventionally vinifed wines without getting headaches.

This webinar looks at SO2’s properties, and why it is so useful in winemaking. What quantites are typically used, and which rules and regulations govern sulphur use? We will also dig into the science behind the intolerance claims. How many people are really allergic to SO2, and are the normal levels found in wines likely to cause issues or not? And why does just about every bottle of wine on the planet have those words “contains sulphites” on the back – even those made by natural winemakers who claim not to add any?

What are the challenges of making wine when a winemaker decides to minimise or completely do without the use of added SO2? What can go wrong, and how much do we know about the scourge of natural wine known as mousiness?

This session covers the whole spectrum of winemakers and winemaking, looks at the varying attitudes to sulphur usage, and what this ultimately means in terms of the quality and properties of what ends up in your glass.

Presenter: Simon J Woolf

Simon J Woolf is an award-winning English author and wine writer, currently based in The Netherlands.

An acknowledged expect on the developing niche of natural wine, he's written for Decanter magazine, Meininger’s Wine Business International, World of Fine Wine and Noble Rot, and many other publications. Simon is the editor of The Morning Claret, an online wine magazine which specialises in natural, biodynamic, organic and orange wine.

Simon's first book "Amber Revolution - How the world learned to love orange wine" was published in 2018, and won the Roederer Wine book of the year award in 2019. Simon has also won numerous awards for his magazine features and online columns.

Simon travels regularly to countries such as Georgia, Slovenia, Italy and Portugal, where he continues to research the stories and traditions behind artisan winemaking. His second book, Foot Trodden, a collaboration with photographer and wine communicator Ryan Opaz, was published in October 2021. It is described as a journey deep into the soul of Portuguese wine.

Simon is also active as a presenter, editor, wine judge and translator.

Polyphenols, in particular anthocyanins and tannins, are the main contributors of wine color and mouthfeel, and are strongly related to the wine quality evaluation. In this webinar an introduction on their origin in grape, evolution during ripening and extraction in the winemaking process will be explained. Moreover, the implication of the technological approach to vinification will be discussed, such as maceration style or the use of oak container. Tannins' implication on mouthfeel is crucial in term of intensity and quality of astringency, and the varietal characteristics are a fundamental knowledge for the winemaker’s choice. On this regard, we will propose an insight of our research on the sensory features of the variety Nebbiolo, the base of several Italian PDO such as Barolo, Barbaresco, and Sforzato di Valtellina.

PRESENTERS: VINCENZO GERBI AND MARIA ALESSANDRA PAISSONI 

Vincenzo Gerbi is full Professor of Oenology at the University of Turin. Most of his research topics have mainly focused on oenology. He is the author of 444 publications, including 217 articles in journals (121 on ISI journals). He is on charge of the experimental cellar of the University of Turin. He carries out an intense activity of dissemination of scientific results to technicians in the wine sector, producer associations and tasters.He is the holder of the Oenology course of the degree course in Viticulture and Oenology, Enography of the inter-university master's degree course in Viticultural and Oenological Sciences. From 2012 to 2015 he was president of SISTAl (Italian Society of Food Science and Technology). From November 2013 to February 2017 he was president of AISSA (Italian Association of Agricultural Scientific Societies). In 2019 he was awarded the Angelo Betti prize, Meritorious in agriculture - Grand CANGRANDE medal.

 Maria Alessandra Paissoni achieved a co-jointed PhD between University of Turin and University of Bordeaux on the sensory characterization of grape phenolic compounds and their involvement in wine in-mouth properties. Author of 55 scientific and technical contributions in the Oenology field (20 of them on ISI journal), she continues her research activity at the Oenology unit in University of Turin, where her main topic is the implication of winemaking techniques on the sensory properties of wine. With Professor Gerbi, they co-hold the course of Enography at the inter-university Master degree of Viticultural and Oenological Science that focuses on varieties characterization and on the their valorisation.

Published in Vinification

Have you read all about winemaking from books, but still struggle with confusing concepts? Have you ever wanted to dive deeper into a particular winemaking topic but didn't know anyone to ask? Winemaker and Master of Wine Nova Cadamatre is back for the second of a three-part series that will pull back the curtain on different winemaking styles. This second webinar covers Red winemaking. The third part will cover Dessert, Sparkling, and Fortified winemaking later this year. If you missed part one, do not worry; it is available here, but you don't have to attend part one to enjoy parts two and three. 

PRESENTER: Nova Cadamatre, MW 

A winemaker with a broad and diverse background, Cadamatre started in wine on the East Coast as a winemaking apprentice with Stargazers Vineyard in 2003. After graduating from Cornell University in 2006 with a Bachelor's in Viticulture, Nova moved to California. During her time in California, she worked with fruit from all over the state, eventually settling in Napa and focusing on Bordeaux and Burgundian varieties from some of the top vineyards in the area, including To Kalon, Vine Hill Ranch, MacDonald, Detert, and Hyde Vineyard. In 2015, she started her brand Trestle Thirty One, in the Finger Lakes of NY. In 2020, added Snowshell Vineyards for Naked Wines and, in 2022, will be launching Fiadh Ruadh, a 100% Cabernet Sauvignon from Stags Leap AVA in Napa. She currently goes back and forth between Napa and the Finger Lakes to manage both her CA projects and her projects in NY.

In 2017, Nova was the first female winemaker in the US to achieve the title of Master of Wine. In addition, she has been named to Wine Enthusiast's Top 40 under 40 list and has numerous 90+ scoring wines to her credit from both coasts.

 

 

Published in Vinification

Have you read all about winemaking from books but some concepts are style confusing?  Have you ever wanted to dive deeper into a particular winemaking topic but didn't know anyone to ask? Join winemaker and Master of Wine, Nova Cadamatre for the first of a three part series which will pull back the curtain on different styles of winemaking.  The first part will cover White and Rose styles of wine.  Red, Dessert, Sparkling, and Fortified winemaking will be covered over parts 2 and 3 later this year.

PRESENTER: Nova Cadamatre, MW 

A winemaker with a wide and diverse background, Cadamatre started in wine on the East Coast as a winemaking apprentice with Stargazers Vineyard in 2003.  After graduating from Cornell University in 2006 with a Bachelor’s in Viticulture, Nova moved to California.  During her time in California, she worked with fruit from all over the state eventually settling in Napa and focusing on Bordeaux and Burgundian varieties from some of the top vineyards in the area including To Kalon, Vine Hill Ranch, MacDonald, Detert, and Hyde Vineyard.  In 2015, she started her brand Trestle Thirty One in the Finger Lakes of NY.  In 2020 added Snowshell Vineyards for Naked Wines and in 2022 will be launching Fiadh Ruadh, a 100% Cabernet Sauvignon from Stags Leap AVA in Napa.  She currently goes back and forth between Napa and the Finger Lakes to manage both her CA projects and her projects in NY.

In 2017, Nova was the first female winemaker in the US to achieve the title of Master of Wine.  She has been named to Wine Enthusiast’s Top 40 under 40 list and has numerous 90+ scoring wines to her credit from both coasts.

 

 

Published in Vinification

Join vigneron Olivier Humbrecht MW, of famed estate Zind Humbrecht in Alsace, for a deep dive into one of the key building blocks of wine: acidity!

In this webinar, you will learn about:

- The different types of acids found in grapes and wine and their sensory perception

- How to not only quantify but qualify acidity in wine

- The viticultural factors influencing acidity in the grape 

- The vinification practices and factors impacting acidity in the final product

- Evolution of wine acids with age

Olivier will also illustrate his talk with some real-life data and text-book examples of acids measured in various types of wine depending on various variables such as grape varieties, vintage, ripeness, with/without malolactic fermentation and terroirs.  Sharpen your tasting skills by understanding one of the key parameters that makes up the structure of a wine!

Presenter: Olivier Humbrecht, MW

Olivier Humbrecht studied wine together with wine marketing and wine business for five years in Toulouse, and then got the chance to do his ‘military service’ working for Sopexa in London.  He learned about and enrolled on the MW course, becoming France’s first ever Master of Wine in 1989.  He began to work with his father, and converted the family domaine to biodynamics in the early 1990s.  His father had painstakingly built up a unique collection of hill-site vineyards over the decades, notably clearing and replanting a quarter of the great historic Grand Cru of Rangen de Thann with Olivier in his later school years.  Olivier has continued to build on this, notably with the recent acquisition of a parcel of Sommerberg to complement the family’s Grand Cru holdings in Brand, Hengst and Goldert, and to complement its other holdings of Rotenberg, Clos Hauserer, Clos Jebsal, Heimbourg, Herrenweg and Clos Windsbuhl.

Olivier’s respectful, non-interventionist winemaking, combined with his and his father’s fastidious viticulture, has given the world vintage after vintage of magnificently differentiated, nuanced bottlings: global white-wine references.  He has never stopped experimenting and improving on his work, using biodynamic practices, changed row orientations and re-thought canopies recently to produce a much greater percentage of dry wines than before.

 

 

Published in Wine Tasting

Every drop of wine we ever drink is the product of observation, intervention and craftsmanship.  Without intervention, every wine would be oxidising and turning to vinegar; without craftsmanship, every wine would be rough and unpalatable.  Advances in craftsmanship have brought us the extraordinary beauty and diversity we are all familiar with and that we celebrate in today’s wine world.

What have been the key winemaking advances of the last two decades, and what changes and challenges await in a world of rapid and unprecedented climate change? 

 Among the many topics our expert panel hopes to touch on are

  • Dramatic advances in the sorting and handling of harvested fruit
  • The deepening understanding of balance in wine (acidity, alcohol, other elements)
  • Changing attitudes to the role of oak in élevage, and the increasing use of large wooden vessels, of well-seasoned oak, of concrete and of earthenware vessels
  • The role of oxygen in fermentation and ageing processes (micro-oxygenation through to controlled oxidation)
  • Skin-contact white wines (orange or amber wines, or qvevri-made white wines)
  • The deepening understanding of tannins, especially in red wines, and the extraordinary advances in textural sophistication of red wines in certain regions
  • The meaning and application of “non-interventionism” as a means to achieving vineyard or terroir expression
  • ‘Precision’ and ‘purity’ as the new aesthetic desiderata for wine, replacing those such as ‘power’, ‘opulence’ and ‘generosity’
  • The role of (primary) fruit flavours in wine
  • Warm and hot vintages: responses in vineyard and winery
  • Redefining varietal styles and regional styles for a changing world

The panel will discuss these and other questions in an accessible, non-technical style, with the emphasis on those changes most clearly evident to wine students and keen wine drinkers.

Wine Scholar Guild Academic Advisor Andrew Jefford, speaking from France, will be bringing together a panel of key thinkers, writers and winemakers in four countries to talk through these and other issues. 

Fiona Morrison MW is a writer, winemaker and wine merchant based in both Bordeaux (where with her husband Jacques Thienpont she manages Ch Le Pin, L’If and Le Hêtre) and in Belgium, where she manages the family Thienpont négociant business; she obtained her MW in 1994. 

St Helena-based Rosemary Cakebread owns and makes the wines for the much-admired Gallica; she is a former winemaker and consulting winemaker for Spottswoode. 

Consultant and writer Pedro Ballesteros MW is a qualified agronomical engineer and holds a Masters degree in viticulture and oenology, as well as having obtained his MW in 2010.  A polymath and polyglot (working in four languages: English, French, Spanish and Italian), Pedro is based in Brussels where he formerly worked for the European Union. 

Tuscany-based Alberto Antonini was cited by Decanter magazine in 2015 as one of the five most influential winemaking consultants in the world.  After training in Tuscany, Bordeaux and in Napa and working for Frescobaldi and Col D’Orcia, Alberto now consults in Italy, Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, California, Canada, Spain, Portugal, Armenia, Russia, Israel and Australia. 

Published in Vinification
Wednesday, 13 June 2018 11:22

Appassimento with Alan Tardi

The technique of allowing grapes to dry out and shrivel up after harvest and before vinification is an ancient one that dates back to the early stages of serious wine making in places like Mesopotamia, Greece and Italy via the Ancient Romans. And nowhere else in the world is this practice as alive and well today as it is in Italy.

In this webinar we’ll investigate the early origins of this practice and the reasons behind it.

Then, pausing for a quick look at the wine called Commandaria from Cyprus that is a very early and still extant example, we’ll flash forward to a survey of wines that continue to be produced by this technique today, both dry and sweet, including Recioto della Valpolicella and Amarone, Sfursat/Sforzato (nebbiolo from the Valtellina, Lombardy), Erbaluce di Caluso, Malanotte del Piave (Raboso), Sciacchetrà (Cinque Terre, Liguria), and/or Vin Santo (Tuscany).

We’ll take a look at the various grape varieties, the origins of the local traditions, the terroir, a representative producer or two, and food pairings. Specific examples chosen for discussion will be the ones deemed most interesting and representative.

Presenter: Alan Tardi

Alan Tardi first became interested in wine through food, working as a cook, chef, and chef-owner in New York City.

As a freelance food and wine journalist, Tardi has authored numerous articles for publications including The New York Times, Wine & Spirits Magazine, The Wine Spectator, Decanter, and Sommelier Journal.

In 2003, Alan moved to the village of Castiglione Falletto in the Barolo region of Italy, where he spent several years working in the surrounding vineyards and wineries through all phases of the growing and production process.

This lead to his first book, 'Romancing the Vine: Life, Love and Transformation in the Vineyards of Barolo' (St Martins Press, 2006), which won a James Beard Award for Best Wine and Spirits Book of 2006.

In 2015, Tardi became the first-ever US Ambassador of Conegliano Valdobbiadene Prosecco.

His new book, “Champagne, Uncorked: The House of Krug and the Timeless Allure of the World’s Most Celebrated Drink” (Hachette 2016) recently won a Gourmand Best in the World Award.

Published in Italian Wine 101

Rosé winemaking is not as simple as books would have you believe.

In fact, there is a wide range of complex vinification techniques resulting in a wide gamut of wine styles and an even wider range of colors and hues.

After a year’s worth of research while writing a book on rosé, Elizabeth Gabay, MW, has found that defining and perfecting pink is a lot more involved than saignée and direct press! This webinar offers you a chance to get technical and cutting-edge! Join us!

Presenter: Elizabeth Gabay MW

  • Master of Wine specialized in Provence
  • Provence Resident since 2002
  • Speaker at international wine conferences and international wine judge
  • Author of Rose: Understanding the Pink Wine Revolution

About Elizabeth's book: Rosé: Understanding the Pink Wine Revolution

Rose has seen a huge boom in sales over the last twenty-five years. Popular particularly with younger drinkers, its move into the spotlight seems to be part of a fashion for all things pink. The wines are often thought of as fresh and undemanding but while for many that is part of their appeal, here Master of Wine Elizabeth Gabay reveals the other side of rose, discovering wines (some unavailable beyond the winery steps) that are every bit as complex and intriguing as their red and white cellarmates.

After taking us through the history of rose and discussing varieties and winemaking methods, Gabay turns her attention to the regions where rose is made, first introducing us to historic wines such as Tavel, Cigales and Rose d’Anjou. She next journeys to the heart of the revolution, Provence. The region’s pale-hued wines have become the height of fashion, with wineries owned by Hollywood stars and wines such as Garrus commanding premium prices. Unsurprisingly this has led to much emulation, but as Gabay continues her global rose investigations she discovers that pale is not the only interesting form of rose.
Indeed, one challenge for rose producers is persuading drinkers to look beyond the colour, for as Rose demonstrates these wines come in a huge variety of styles. From traditional clairet roses made using the saignee method to vins gris, natural wines and experimental styles, produced as far afield as British Columbia and Marlborough, California and Crimea, Gabay has tried (nearly) all of them. The result is a detailed yet conversational book that will provoke discussion among those in the industry, wine aficionados and students.

 

Published in Vinification
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